The Grovestead

Farm, Family, Fun.

a country blizzard


Like most of Minnesota, we are in the middle of one incredible blizzard right now. And it’s so fun! Our big kids were out this morning and now they just bundled up again, begging me to put my snow pants on to join them. It might seem silly to go play in a blizzard, but after all of the cold weather we have had, this windy stuff combined with the white stuff is a blast.  The drifts are growing, the evergreens are gorgeous and the whole world is a wonderland.


The Grovestead Newsletter – Fall 2017

The Grovestead - Fall 2017 Pic

Our 3rd Grovestead newsletter is finished and ready for download! We intentionally make these newsletters to be printed and enjoyed when you have time to read it. So brew a cup of coffee or grab a cold beverage, and enjoy!

Click here to download:

Or copy and paste this link into a web browser:
https://thegrovestead.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/The-Grovestead-Fall-2017.pdf

 


The Grovestead Newsletter – Summer 2017

The Grovestead Newsletter Cover Vol 1 Issue 2

Our Summer newsletter is finished and ready for download! We intentionally make these newsletters to be printed and enjoyed when you have time to read it. So brew a cup of coffee or grab a cold beverage, and enjoy!

Click here to download:

Or copy and paste this link into a web browser:
https://thegrovestead.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/The-Grovestead-Summer-2017.pdf

 


Sheep Week

Good Shepherd

Oh my word. The sheep. First of all, they are so pretty out in our pasture. A group of fluffy white in the middle of all our green just feels right. They are pretty and pastoral. Their lambs are darling. And their loyalty to their shepherd demonstrates so much of scripture, lived out right in front of us. Jesus said, “I am the good shepherd, I know my sheep and my sheep know me.” Rory and his sheep are tight. He’s a good shepherd and they’ve got a special bond.

Flock of sheep in pasture

I, on the other hand, don’t feel quite so connected to the sheep. Mostly because I’m not out there multiple times a day caring for them. But also because sheep are pretty aloof if you’re not the one bringing them their food. The goats have big personality. The sheep seem indifferent.

Anyway, Rory is trying this rotational grazing thing that is good for the soil, good for the sheep and good for sustainable land practices. He has nine paddocks set up in our orchard for the sheep to rotate on. They’ll live in one paddock for a few days before being moved to the next one and on and on. In the end, this will be a really low-key way to pasture the sheep.

But this year it has taken some serious set up. On the advice of another farmer, we didn’t let our sheep out on the pasture until June 1, so that the grass and alfalfa could establish itself after the winter. But it turns out that this year, that date was way too late. The grass took off the last week of May, and by the time we realized what was happening out there, the grass was taller than Rory!

Grass growing out of control

Sheep like young grass, the shorter stuff. Not the tall stuff. So Rory has been out there FOR HOURS mowing down the tall grass in each paddock making it ready for the white fluffs to come and lay down in his green pastures.

Mowing Tall Grasses

And then this was the week that we finally found someone to come and shear our sheep. And just in time! These poor guys have been wearing their huge wool sweaters all spring and tomorrow is supposed to hit 99 degrees here. The shearing was eventful and stressful. We had an older farmer and a neighbor come to help us with the hopes that we might learn how to shear on our own.

Shearing the sheep with Lloyd and Gary

Rory and Farmer Lloyd wrangled the first sheep out on the concrete so the wool wouldn’t be mixed with the bedding of the stalls. They wrestled that sheep to the ground and in the mayhem Rory got his finger bit so hard that blood was dripping all over that clean concrete floor. He left to clean his wound, and I left with the children, discussing what “stressful” means on our way into the house. Later, I went back out to see how it was going and a different sheep spotted me in the window, got spooked and pulled the halter loose and began running pell mell all around the barn with half a fleece trailing behind her, through the dirty bedding. I quietly backed up and pretended I hadn’t returned.

In the end we decided that we will gladly hire this job out each year. And we will forever stand in awe of 4-H children who shear their sheep with confidence and ease. Actually, we will stand in awe that 4-H children can even move their sheep from their stall out to the arena for showing. We will watch these sheep events with much more appreciation this year at the fair!

And finally, because of the heat, and because our fruit trees are still too little to provide shade, the sheep will need shade in each paddock. So Rory worked the past few nights out in the barn building a mobile shelter. It’s pretty awesome.

Portable Shelter

All in all, this whole week has been about the sheep. They even found their way out of their electric fence and into the neighbors back yard. But when Rory called to them, they came back right away. Because he knows his sheep and his sheep know him. He’s a good shepherd.


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